NFL Retirees Go to Washington: Now What is Next ??

(Philadelphia, Pa) —Well the retired players took their fight to Congress, but we will have to wait and see who comes out the winner from the festivities. Several aging NFL retirees told Congress that playing professional football had left them with broken bodies, brain damage and empty bank accounts. Curt Marsh, an Oakland Raider from 1981-87, was one of the more compelling speakers talking about his leg amputation, more than 30 surgeries and multiple doctor visits before he was approved for disability payments. The retired players wanted everyone to know that the NFL and the NFLPA were not doing the right thing in terms of getting older retirees funds for disability from the league’s $1.1 billion pension fund. The lawmakers harped on the fact that the NFLPA only represents active players (no retiree representation) and that the union and NFL owners decide who sits on the panels that scrutinizes which retired players get disability payments. Congressmen took in all of the data and said they may get involved if a better pension and disability system isn’t created, which leaves a big ambiguous hole in the whole proceedings. But lets hope it does not get to that point. I am in agreement with NFL senior vice president Dennis Curran who said at the proceeding, “I don’t think a law change is necessary (for this problem)”

I believe the answer to this entire mess lies within the fractured family of current NFL players, NFL Retirees, NFL Officials, and the NFLPA. These entities need to figure out a better way for the large pension that is out there to be distributed equitably. When a past NFL great like Mike Ditka stands up and says “It’s right versus wrong,” and “It’s do the ethical thing or do the wrong thing. The NFL and NFLPA reported that $126 million a year goes into pension and post-career disability benefits for retired players and their families. They showed that their accounts pay out $60 million a year to those players, $20 million of it for disability payments. The big problem though is only 317 out of more than 10,000 eligible players are getting disability payments out of that fund, officials said. In order to make everyone whole, I am sure that NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell, NFL Players President Troy Vincent, and NFLPA head Gene Upshaw will find a new way of spreading the pie out, so everyone can be fulfilled and the NFL can continue their joyride as the #1 sports entity in the world. For starters last week agreed to allow any former player who qualified as disabled under the Social Security system to be considered as disabled under the NFL-NFLPA system Another big hurdle will be the next time a Collective Bargaining Agreement is reached between the NFL and it players, because disability benefits and pension systems are set during CBA negotiations. In the most recent collective bargaining agreement (2006), payments from the pension fund were raised by 25 percent for players who retired before 1982 and 10 percent for those who retired after 1982.

The main thing is that in 2011when the current CBA expires, younger players will need to realize that one day they too will be retirees. Instead of going for all current $$$ they will need to pressure their union (NFLPA) to stuff the coffers for their own future while aiding the players that built this game as well. We all know that the NFL and the Commish will help clean up their own house and not keep their head in the sand ala baseball. I like that the system has been investigated and that in the next few years this fight will most likely become more quiet and we can then concentrate on the play on the field.

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NFL Retirees Go to Washington: Now What is Next ??

Well the retired players took their fight to Congress, but we will have to wait and see who comes out the winner from the festivities. Several aging NFL retirees told Congress that playing professional football had left them with broken bodies, brain damage and empty bank accounts. Curt Marsh, an Oakland Raider from 1981-87, was one of the more compelling speakers talking about his leg amputation, more than 30 surgeries and multiple doctor visits before he was approved for disability payments. The retired players wanted everyone to know that the NFL and the NFLPA were not doing the right thing in terms of getting older retirees funds for disability from the league’s $1.1 billion pension fund. The lawmakers harped on the fact that the NFLPA only represents active players (no retiree representation) and that the union and NFL owners decide who sits on the panels that scrutinizes which retired players get disability payments. Congressmen took in all of the data and said they may get involved if a better pension and disability system isn’t created, which leaves a big ambiguous hole in the whole proceedings. But lets hope it does not get to that point. I am in agreement with NFL senior vice president Dennis Curran who said at the proceeding, “I don’t think a law change is necessary (for this problem)”

I believe the answer to this entire mess lies within the fractured family of current NFL players, NFL Retirees, NFL Officials, and the NFLPA. These entities need to figure out a better way for the large pension that is out there to be distributed equitably. When a past NFL great like Mike Ditka stands up and says “It’s right versus wrong,” and “It’s do the ethical thing or do the wrong thing. The NFL and NFLPA reported that $126 million a year goes into pension and post-career disability benefits for retired players and their families. They showed that their accounts pay out $60 million a year to those players, $20 million of it for disability payments. The big problem though is only 317 out of more than 10,000 eligible players are getting disability payments out of that fund, officials said. In order to make everyone whole, I am sure that NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell, NFL Players President Troy Vincent, and NFLPA head Gene Upshaw will find a new way of spreading the pie out, so everyone can be fulfilled and the NFL can continue their joyride as the #1 sports entity in the world. For starters last week agreed to allow any former player who qualified as disabled under the Social Security system to be considered as disabled under the NFL-NFLPA system Another big hurdle will be the next time a Collective Bargaining Agreement is reached between the NFL and it players, because disability benefits and pension systems are set during CBA negotiations. In the most recent collective bargaining agreement (2006), payments from the pension fund were raised by 25 percent for players who retired before 1982 and 10 percent for those who retired after 1982.

The main thing is that in 2011when the current CBA expires, younger players will need to realize that one day they too will be retirees. Instead of going for all current $$$ they will need to pressure their union (NFLPA) to stuff the coffers for their own future while aiding the players that built this game as well. We all know that the NFL and the Commish will help clean up their own house and not keep their head in the sand ala baseball. I like that the system has been investigated and that in the next few years this fight will most likely become more quiet and we can then concentrate on the play on the field.

The Waiving of Tank Johnson Sends the Right Message

(Philadelphia, Pa) — Welcome to the new NFL, where “character” outweighs a player’s performance or potential. Following in the footsteps and words of disciplinarian NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell, the Chicago Bears had enough of front line, but troubled DT Tank Johnson. Johnson’s upcoming league mandated 8 game suspension was not enough to deter him from his foolish ways, so the team waived him three days after his latest off the field transgression of being pulled over and taken in on suspicion of DUI. The waiving of Johnson marked a watershed moment for the team and league. The move was an act that must open all the eyes of 1500 plus NFL players and their team’s personnel departments. It is one thing for the Bengals to release fringe pro linebacker AJ Nicholson for his problems, but a message was sent that you are not above the image or rules of the NFL and that your career can be taken away from you if you don’t fall in line with the newly mandated league cleanup. Johnson a 300+ pound 2004 2nd Rd draft pick from Washington, was at the top of one the most coveted positions by coaches and GM’s (run stuffing DT).  But not even he could escape the new atmosphere of the NFL cracking down on “thuggish” behavior. He had gotten chance after chance, because he was so integral at the run-stuffer position for a 13-3 Super Bowl bound team that the Bears chose to be “soft” on him in the past. Johnson only received a team mandated 1 game suspension for being involved in weapons charges within a month of the Super Bowl.  He was not only allowed to play, he received the honor of starting in the game. In the off-season they continued to coddle him by providing him with counseling (no kick in the a_s) and support during his recent two month incarceration for violating probation on a gun charge.

However this time a message needed to be sent and the Bears clearly could not take another PR hit or slap in the face from Tank. The team through general manager Jerry Angelo issued a statement saying, “We are upset and embarrassed by Tank’s actions last week,” “He compromised the credibility of our organization. We made it clear to him that he had no room for error. Our goal was to help someone through a difficult period in his life, but the effort needs to come from both sides. It didn’t, and we have decided to move on”.

The embarrassment to the NFL over player conduct has gotten to the point that the league is being compared to the NBA, which has suffered from several incidents and is now fighting apathy amongst their fan base. We will have to wait and see if the new “Enough is Enough” policy that has gotten Pacman Jones suspended for the season and Chris Henry and Tank Johnson (waived as well) suspended for 8 games will send the needed message to all of the players, because fans and media are watching. I believe if the shenanigans continue the NFL, which is a billion dollar conglomerate will start to feel the effects in ratings, merchandising, and attendance. It will take time for their wallet to be hit so the Commish, NFLPA, and others concern league entities will need to work together on fixing the problem. But they need to remember public outcry can move swiftly toward bottomline of $$$.

The waiving of Johnson, the suspensions, new policy, and rookie symposium are just the start on the road to the league fixing its image problem, but it was a much needed begining.  I know I will be real interested to see in October, if Johnson is reinstated if any teams that are having difficulty stopping the run will sign Big Tank despite his image.  My guess is there is always a maverick owner that will do anything to win. I am already hearing teams like the Cowboys, Cardinals, Raiders, and Bills being mentioned as possible landing stops for Tank, because he will come at the right price.

The Waiving of Tank Johnson Sends the Right Message

Welcome to the new NFL, where “character” outweighs a player’s performance or potential. Following in the footsteps and words of disciplinarian NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell, the Chicago Bears had enough of front line, but troubled DT Tank Johnson. Johnson’s upcoming league mandated 8 game suspension was not enough to deter him from his foolish ways, so the team waived him three days after his latest off the field transgression of being pulled over and taken in on suspicion of DUI. The waiving of Johnson marked a watershed moment for the team and league. The move was an act that must open all the eyes of 1500 plus NFL players and their team’s personnel departments. It is one thing for the Bengals to release fringe pro linebacker AJ Nicholson for his problems, but a message was sent that you are not above the image or rules of the NFL and that your career can be taken away from you if you don’t fall in line with the newly mandated league cleanup. Johnson a 300+ pound 2004 2nd Rd draft pick from Washington, was at the top of one the most coveted positions by coaches and GM’s (run stuffing DT).  But not even he could escape the new atmosphere of the NFL cracking down on “thuggish” behavior. He had gotten chance after chance, because he was so integral at the run-stuffer position for a 13-3 Super Bowl bound team that the Bears chose to be “soft” on him in the past. Johnson only received a team mandated 1 game suspension for being involved in weapons charges within a month of the Super Bowl.  He was not only allowed to play, he received the honor of starting in the game. In the off-season they continued to coddle him by providing him with counseling (no kick in the a_s) and support during his recent two month incarceration for violating probation on a gun charge.

However this time a message needed to be sent and the Bears clearly could not take another PR hit or slap in the face from Tank. The team through general manager Jerry Angelo issued a statement saying, “We are upset and embarrassed by Tank’s actions last week,” “He compromised the credibility of our organization. We made it clear to him that he had no room for error. Our goal was to help someone through a difficult period in his life, but the effort needs to come from both sides. It didn’t, and we have decided to move on”.

The embarrassment to the NFL over player conduct has gotten to the point that the league is being compared to the NBA, which has suffered from several incidents and is now fighting apathy amongst their fan base. We will have to wait and see if the new “Enough is Enough” policy that has gotten Pacman Jones suspended for the season and Chris Henry and Tank Johnson (waived as well) suspended for 8 games will send the needed message to all of the players, because fans and media are watching. I believe if the shenanigans continue the NFL, which is a billion dollar conglomerate will start to feel the effects in ratings, merchandising, and attendance. It will take time for their wallet to be hit so the Commish, NFLPA, and others concern league entities will need to work together on fixing the problem. But they need to remember public outcry can move swiftly toward bottomline of $$$.

The waiving of Johnson, the suspensions, new policy, and rookie symposium are just the start on the road to the league fixing its image problem, but it was a much needed begining.  I know I will be real interested to see in October, if Johnson is reinstated if any teams that are having difficulty stopping the run will sign Big Tank despite his image.  My guess is there is always a maverick owner that will do anything to win. I am already hearing teams like the Cowboys, Cardinals, Raiders, and Bills being mentioned as possible landing stops for Tank, because he will come at the right price.

NFL Retirees to Have Their Say in Front of Congress

I hope the NFL is prepared for a March 17, 2005 moment tomorrow (June 26,2007) when NFL Retirees and others stand before congress and open up a can of worms regarding why a $10 Billion dollar league is having problems taking care of their former players. You may ask why March 17, 2005 is so important, well that is the day baseball basically caused irrevocable damage to their sport. Baseball having come back from a strike and regaining popularity was asked to appear to talk about steroids. The fiasco turned surreal on all our televisions as Mark McGwire refused to talk, Sammy Sosa forgot the English language and Rafael Palmero wagged his finger saying the infamous words “I have never used steroids”. The drama was must see TV and the national pastime had a black eye that would last for years to come with many fans pointing to that date as the day baseball died in their hearts.

Now the NFL is facing a similar situation with outspoken Hall of Famers Joe DeLamielleure, Mike Ditka, Lem Barney, Harry Carson, Jerry Kramer and others being called to Congressional hearings by Rep. Linda Sanchez (D-Calif). The hearings will be the culmination of a yearlong dispute over benefits between the retirees and the NFL Players Association and their former brother in arms Gene Upshaw, who happens to be the executive director of the NFLPA. Sanchez recently rhetorically asked, “The NFL is a billion-dollar industry, and yet the players who built the league are too often left to fend for themselves?” The statement rings very true as we have heard horrible stories of past players going bankrupt with medical bills and having dementia as early as a couple years after their playing days are finished. I recently saw the compelling story of former offensive lineman Brian DeMarco on the evening news. DeMarco, 35, is only a couple years removed from playing in the NFL and has spent four years trying to get disability benefits from the NFLPA, while not being able to hold a job, having no medical benefits and being homeless at times. His story is just the tip of the iceberg, because there are many more gut wrenching ex-player tales. These former players who helped build the game are too often left to fend for themselves after 5 years of retirement (time when medical benefits end). Some cannot care for themselves or their families on meager pensions that have not changed in years. They have asked for the league office and NFLPA to help in the past, but the two entities have always stuck their heads in the sand professing that the NFL was stronger than ever. Well the league is strong, but the roots (retirees) are withering and the NFL and NFLPA don’t care.

In my opinion this situation should have never gotten to this point. The NFLPA and league should have attempted every possible scenario to head off the hearings and keep this matter behind closed doors. The new Commissioner Roger Goodell has been extremely proactive in his short term in office listening to all issues affecting the league including the retirees’ gripe. He tried to issue a mayo culpa last week offering to speed up payments to veterans that have been stuck in the appeals process, but this boat has already gone out to sea. The predicament first and foremost must squarely be laid in front of past NFL Commissioner Paul Tagliabue and Upshaw. For years these two worked in a symbiotic relationship cutting sweetheart deals for current players and owners in an effort to keep labor peace. Modern players (NFLPA) gave concessions in return for higher salaries, free agency, and signing bonuses, which is the NFL’s version of guaranteed money and the owners experienced exponential growth with individual franchises valued at the billion dollar mark. Television has been the driving force behind the growth, as the NFL’s television contract reached a worth $17.2 billion in 2005 and the league became the nation’s number one game with fans clamoring for the product. But one of the hush-hush problems was that while the league was moving up in popularity, r etirees whose careers are an average of 3.5 years were left out in the cold. Well now the old guys will have their say and I say “Amen” and I cannot wait to see where we go from here. I am sure the NFL is already coming up with their damage control plan as we speak.

Hamburg Wins World Bowl XV 37-28, But is it the Last One ??

If a minor league NFL game is played and no one in the States watches, did it really happen. The answer is “Yes” and over 48,000 people packed Commerzbank Arena to see World Bowl XV as the Hamburg Sea Devils defeated the Frankfurt Galaxy 37-28 in what could possibly be the last World Bowl. By the way being the “football junkie” that I am, I watched the first half on NFL Network before I was called away to do some radio work.

In the game, Hamburg quarterback Casey Bramlet (Redskins) was named the MVP after passing for 347 yards and four TDs (World Bowl Record). Bramlet out dueled regular season Co-MVP Frankfurt quarterback JT O’Sullivan in what might have been the best World Bowl ever. Hamburg took the noisy Frankfurt crowd out of the game early and never stopped unit they were holding the prized globe trophy of the league. Hamburg won their first championship by having a good mix on offense and a “bend but don’t break” mindset on defense in an attempt at keeping O’Sullivan and the Galaxy’s spread offense in check. Now the players from NFLE will have the enviable task of geeting their bodies healthy in a month and competing in training camp versus guys, who have not had contact since February.

We will have to see if NFL Europa can survive to World Bowl XVI, because right now the league is on life support. There have been whispers that the NFL Europa, which came into effect in 1991 as the World League of American Football (WLAF) has run its course. In the next few weeks NFL’s owners and league officials will decide if having a minor league is feasible. I believe that with the millions already spent operating a league away from their base in New York city and housing teams in Europe that there will be too many negatives for the NFL to continue to operate NFL Europa. Plus with the success of the upcoming October 28th game in London pitting the Giants versus the Dolphins and more regular season European games on the horizion, there are signs that the game is already strong enough in Europe that they no longer need to send 2nd tier players oversees for marketing. An example of how ravenous fans are for the NFL and the support that lies in Europe was shown reccently when the first 40,000 tickets for the game at the new Wembley Stadium sold in 90 minutes and the 90,000 stadium is a complete sellout. My guess is that the NFL probably will explore their own minor league based in United States in the future and that football in Europe will continue at the club level and that NFL Europa will be no more. Maybe with the NFL’s minor league plans in the U.S, they could consult Vince McMahon (XFL), Mark Cuban (UFL), or Donald Trump (USFL) on the idea of a start up league.

Now it is time to take some relaxation before getting ready for training camp next month.

World Bowl XV Preview

Amidst rumors that the NFL is thinking about pulling the plug on NFL Europa, the World Bowl is back. NFLE’s biggest game will be played for the 15th time this weekend as the NFL’s version of the minor leagues steps to the forefront of the NFL Calendar . The Yello Strom sponsored World Bowl XV will be played on Saturday, June 23rd, at 1 PM EST at Commerzbank Arena, Frankfurt . The game will pit the defending champs and home team the Frankfurt Galaxy (7-3) against the Hamburg Sea Devils (7-3). The game will be televised by the NFL Network for the 2nd time and there is an expected crowd of close to 50,000 fans. You can expect the game will give the legions of NFL fans worldwide the opportunity to sustain their “football hunger” for a little while until minicamps and training camps get in full swing.

As a self confessed “football junkie” I enjoy watching international players and NFL Developmental players that may not have the “Draft Pedigree” learning the game and competing at a level that I believe is the closest to the NFL. No offense to the CFL and Arena Football, but you can really see the difference in an NFL stamped product with coaches and players game planning and operating like an NFL franchise. NFL Europe was originally founded in 1991 as the World League of American Football (WLAF). The WLAF was partially backed by the National Football League and, like the current NFL Europa, was a spring developmental league. Originally WLAF had 10 teams playing a 10-game regular season: six teams from the United States , three European teams, and one Canadian team. The two teams emerging from the WLAF semi-final playoffs met at the end of the season in the World Bowl. The first two World Bowl games were held at predetermined locations much like the modern Super Bowl. The original WLAF was marginally popular, with the United States and Canadian teams playing to almost empty stadiums. Attendance was slow in the mid 20,000’s and that figure was boosted by the European based teams. The WLAF continued to struggle in its early years to costs of cross continent travel and partial NFL backing, because of this the league suspended operations in 1993 prior to the season.

In 1995, the NFL decided that a developmental league was a good idea and became the full backers of a new spring league (NFL Europe). The new league was European based equipped with NFL Coaches, Players (Lower Depth Chart Types), and Systems (Game Planning, Film Study, and Scouting). The allocation of young developmental type NFL players that needed a chance to play was the key factor in the league’s rebirth. The league switched to six teams playing a 10-game format in one division with the top two teams making the World Bowl. Eleven years later the league is highly popular in Europe and has a growing fan base in the United States . Even “Soccer Loving Locals” in Europe have embraced American Football’s teams and players. The NFLE even set a record this year averaging 20,024 spectators per game this season. They attracted 600,714 fans to its 30 regular-season games to eclipse the previous record average of 18,965 from 2005. NFL Europa has franchises in Hamburg (Sea Devils – Germany ), Rhein (Fire – Germany ), Amsterdam (Admirals), Frankfurt (Galaxy – Germany ), Berlin (Thunder – Germany ), and Cologne (Centurions – Germany ).

World Bowl XV features Offensive Co-MVP Frankfurt QB J.T O’Sullivan (Chicago Bears) who posted a league-leading passer rating of 104.8 during the regular season and led the league in completions, passing yards and touchdowns. O’Sullivan threw 5 touchdown passes in two games against Hamburg this season. The Sea Devils are stocked as well with QB Casey Bramlet (Washington Redskins), who finished the season ranked third with a passer rating of 97.5 and he tied O’Sullivan for the league lead in touchdown passes. The Sea Devils also feature former Bronco and University of Oklahoma standout running back Quentin Griffin. Griffin did not play last week, but he should be ready to go on Saturday. He finished the season with 358 rushing yards and averaged 36.9 yards on 9 kickoff returns. The Galaxy are making their eighth appearance in the World Bowl and they are attempting to win their fifth title, while this is the first time for the Sea Devils. Both teams had to wait until the last week of the season to qualify for the game.

The storylines from their two games this year are: In the Week 3 meeting at Commerzbank Arena, QB J.T. O’Sullivan (Chicago Bears) threw for 223 yards and one touchdown, which was a 65-yard strike to WR Aaron Hosack as the Galaxy survived. RB Charles Anthony also found the end zone for Frankfurt . Hamburg scored through three Shane Andrus (Indianapolis Colts) field goals and an 18-yard TD pass from QB Casey Bramlet (Washington Redskins) to WR Justin Jenkins. In their 2nd game in week 9 at Hamburg , a wild game ensued. Bramlet threw a game-winning 50-yard touchdown pass to WR Marcus Maxwell ( San Francisco 49ers) with 48 seconds remaining. Galaxy RB DeCori Birmingham (New York Giants) then gave up a decisive safety after attempting an illegal forward pass out of his end zone on a kickoff return. O’Sullivan threw for 376 yards and four touchdowns in a losing effort for the Galaxy.

Notable 2007 Players

  • Derrick Ross, RB Cologne (KC Chiefs) – Ross the Co-Offensive MVP was the NFLE’s leading rusher with 802 yards and four 100-yard games this season. He totaled a league-best 933 yards from scrimmage (802 rushing, 131 receiving) and scored five touchdowns as the Centurions posted a 6-4 record
  • Jason Hall, DE Cologne (Carolina Panthers) – An explosive player that led NFLE in sacks with 12, which was a team record. Hall is a “High Motor” player with good size (6-2, 265). Helped the Centurions boast the No. 1 ranked defense in NFL Europa (256.1 yards per game). The Carolina Panthers’ defensive end also tied a league record by recording a sack in seven consecutive games.
  • Marcus Maxwell, WR Hamburg ( San Francisco 49ers) – Maxwell has a chance to make the Niners roster with Bryant leaving. He led NFL Europa with seven touchdown receptions and finished with 32 catches for 499 yards (15.6-yard average).
  • Greg Eslinger, C Cologne (Denver Broncos) – Eslinger (6-3, 288) was my number one Center in the 2006 draft. After spending a year in reserve for the Broncos, this former Rimington Award winner as the nation’s best center went to work in NFLE. Helped lead the way for Ross and gaining all league honors. Should be a great zone blocking battling player in the future.
  • Adam O’Connor, OT Hamburg (Free Agent) – A converted defensive end with good size (6’7, 300), who is still learning the position. Still made all league and Brian Baldinger says O’Connor reminds him of Matt Lepsis, who made the conversion from tight end to tackle in Barcelona and is now a solid pro for the Broncos.
  • Gary Gibson, DT Hamburg (Baltimore Ravens) – Formed a good run stuffing combo with Thomas Smith. Gibson was all league and has the size (6’5, 318) to make the Ravens. Has potential, but he must stay healthy in camp.

Lloyd’s Leftovers:

  • Yello Strom World Bowl XV will reach an estimated worldwide television audience of more than 150 million in more than 120 countries. The game as stated earlier will be on NFL network with Bob Papa and Brian Baldinger calling the game. This will be Baldinger’s 11th World Bowl and he has been a big proponent of the game.
  • Some notable NFL Europe Alumni include current Atlanta Falcons WR Brian Finneran and Pro Bowl players David Akers, La’Roi Glover, Dante Hall, Adam Vinatieri, Jake Delhomme, Brad Johnson (Super Bowl Champion w/ Tampa Bay) and Kurt Warner (Super Bowl Champion w/ Rams).
  • Some rules that I like from NFL Europa I like are that overtime lasts for 10 minutes with the requirement that each team must have the opportunity of possession at least once. Also with soccer being the traditionally the most popular sport in Europe, the league encourages kicking with awarding 4 points to field goals of more than 50 yards.
  • A great book to read for anyone that wants to learn about NFL Europe and have a reality view of the game should read “The Proving Ground : A Season on the Fringe in NFL Europe”, by Lars Anderson (http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0312269757/103-6943452-8675050?adid=1GVGK1KQGD8WEBX3TE68&camp=14573&creative=327641&link%5Fcode=as1&n=283155). I enjoyed the book and it gave great insight into a day in the life of a NFL Europa team and how the players make through being away from home.

Well there is nothing left, but to enjoy World Bowl XV, so “CHEERS” to BIGPLAY’s fans in the United States and Overseas. Enjoy the game and maybe next year BIGPLAY will be able to enjoy World Bowl XVI in person.